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    • SHOWING
    • 11 Sep -
      12 Sep 2019
      11 Sep - 12 Sep 2019
    About

    Jack Dean, the critically-acclaimed rap storyteller behind Grandad & The Machine, presents a raucous new show with live music about England’s forgotten Luddite rebellion.

    On 9 June 1817 Jeremiah Brandreth assembles a crew of malcontents in a pub near Nottingham. Their plan is to march on London, overthrow the government, wipe out the National Debt and end poverty forever. What Jeremiah doesn’t know is that there is a spy in his ranks with other ideas…

    Featuring an original score and live band, Jeremiah tells the incredible true story of the much-misunderstood Luddite rebellion – a movement that spanned the whole North of England, had more British soldiers fighting it than Napoleon, and made the destruction of machinery a capital offence.

    This little remembered story is brought to life as a live music gig performed by Jack Dean and a three piece band. A cellist, violinist and guitarist work with loop pedals to create an original score that mixes hip-hop, shoe gaze and cinematic composition styles, while Jack Dean delivers an epic true tale exploring lots of characters, all contained within rap verse metre accompanied by a vivid AV design projected onto the stage.

    Jack Dean is an Exeter-based writer, performer and theatre maker who has carried his love of weird and wonderful arrangements of words to many places, from the Bowery Poetry Club in New York, Latitude Festival and the South Bank Centre. Previous productions include ‘Grandad & The Machine’, ‘Horace & The Yeti’, and ‘Nuketown’.

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    7.30pm

    Reviews
    • “Impressive poetic, musical and narrative skills… undoubtedly a performer with an exciting career ahead of him.”

      Exeunt
    • “Artists like rap storyteller Jack Dean make us excited about what they might do next.”

      The Guardian

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